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New Era Newspaper Friday December 15, 2017

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  • Namibia
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16 ADVERT

16 ADVERT Friday, December 15 2017 | NEW ERA The University will be open on Wednesday, 10 January 2018 for the new academic year. ACADEMIC ORIENTATION (1ST YEARS) 18 - 19 Jan Windhoek Main, Health Sciences & Khomasdal Campuses 19 Jan Hifikepunye Pohamba, Oshakati, Rundu, Katima Mulilo & Southern Campuses 26 Jan Ogongo Campus 09 Feb Eng. José Eduardo dos Santos Campus GENERAL ORIENTATION (1ST YEARS) 31 Jan - 02 Feb Windhoek Main, Health Sciences & Khomasdal Campuses 01 - 02 Feb Hifikepunye Pohamba, Ogongo, Oshakati, Rundu, Katima Mulilo & Southern Campuses 01 - 02 Feb Transfer Students (Neudamm & Sam Nujoma Campuses only) ALL APPLICANTS (Kindly visit www.unam.edu.na/registration for detailed information on Registration, Fees & Orientation) ALL CAMPUSES REGISTRATION 2018 Postgraduate Students (Online) ALL CAMPUSES & REGIONAL CENTRES 31 Jan FANR, FOE & FOL 01 Feb FHSS, FOS & FEIT 02 Feb FEMS & FHS Senior Students (Online) ALL CAMPUSES, REGIONAL CENTRES & CENTRE FOR OPEN, DISTANCE & e-LEARNING 15 Jan - 02 Feb Full-time, Part-time & CODeL HEALTH SCIENCES CAMPUS 11 Jan School of Pharmacy 12 Jan School of Medicine First Year Students MAIN CAMPUS 22 Jan Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences (Department of Accounting & Taxation, Department of Economics) {Full-time, Part-time and CODeL} 23 Jan Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences (Department of Political Studies, Department of Management) {Full-time, Part-time and CODeL} 24 Jan Faculty of Science (Surnames A - L) & CODeL (All CODeL Certificates) 25 Jan Faculty of Science (Surnames M - Z) & CODeL (All CODeL Diplomas) 26 Jan Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences 29 Jan Postgraduate Stud. (FANR, FOE, FOL & FOS) 30 Jan Postgraduate Stud. (FHSS, FEMS, FHS, FEIT) ENG. JOSÉ EDUARDO DOS SANTOS CAMPUS 24 Jan Faculty of Engineering (Pre- Engineering) 25 Jan Faculty of Engineering and IT HEALTH SCIENCES CAMPUS 22 Jan School of Nursing (Surnames A - L) 23 Jan School of Nursing (Surnames M - Z) 24 Jan School of Pharmacy 25 Jan School of Medicine (Surnames A - L) 26 Jan School of Medicine (Surnames M - Z) HIFIKEPUNYE POHAMBA CAMPUS 22 Jan Faculty of Education (Diploma in Junior Primary Educ.) {Surnames A - L} 23 Jan Faculty of Education (Diploma in Junior Primary Educ.) {Surnames M - Z} 24 Jan Faculty of Educ. (Pre - & Lower Primary) 25 Jan Faculty of Education (Upper Primary) {Full-time} 26 Jan Faculty of Education (Sec. Education) First Year Students continue... KATIMA MULILO CAMPUS 22 Jan Faculty of Agriculture & Natural Resources 23 Jan Faculty of Education (Upper Primary) {Full-time and CODeL} 24 Jan Faculty of Educ. (Pre - & Lower Primary) {Full-time and CODeL} 25 Jan Faculty of Educ. (Dipl. in Jun. Primary Educ.) KHOMASDAL CAMPUS 22 Jan Faculty of Education (Upper Primary) {Full-time and CODeL} 23 Jan Faculty of Education (Pre-, Lower & Secondary) {Full-time and CODeL} 24 Jan Faculty of Education (Adult Education & Diplomas) {Full-time and CODeL} 25 Jan Faculty of Law {Full-time and CODeL} 26 Jan Faculty of Agriculture & Natural Resources 26 Jan Faculty of Engineering (Pre- Engineering) OGONGO CAMPUS 25 Jan Faculty of Agriculture & Natural Resources OSHAKATI CAMPUS 22 Jan School of Publ. Health & Dipl. in Computing 23 Jan School of Nursing & Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences (Master of Arts in Development Studies) 24 Jan All CODeL Programmes 25 Jan All CODeL Programmes 26 Jan All CODeL Programmes RUNDU CAMPUS 22 Jan School of Nursing 23 Jan Faculty of Educ. (Dipl. in Jun. Primary Educ.) 24 Jan Faculty of Education (Pre - & Lower Primary) {Full-time and CODeL} 25 Jan Faculty of Education (Upper Primary) {Full-time and CODeL} 26 Jan Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences {Full-time, Part-time and CODeL} SOUTHERN CAMPUS 22 Jan Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences {Full-time, Part-time and CODeL} 23 Jan Faculty of Education (Diploma in Junior Primary Educ.) {Full-time and CODeL} 24 Jan Faculty of Education (Pre- & Lower Primary) 25 Jan Faculty of Education (Upper Primary) {Full-time and CODeL} 26 Jan School of Nursing POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS (First Year) 29 Jan Postgraduate Stud. (FANR, FOE, FOL & FOS) 30 Jan Postgraduate Stud. (FHSS, FEMS, FHS, FEIT) LATE REGISTRATION All Campuses excluding Health Sciences Campus (Late fee of N0 payable) 07 - 09 Feb All students COMPULSORY MINIMUM DEPOSITS 2018 ACADEMIC REGISTRATION (N$) DESCRIPTION NAMIBIAN STUDENTS SADC STUDENTS NON SADC STUDENTS Registration fees 1 425.00 1 425.00 1 425.00 Connectivity fees (compulsory - all students) 575.00 575.00 575.000 International Student levy 0 2 500.00 2 500.00 Total registration fees payable DESCRIPTION TUITION FEES (%) 2 000.00 4 500.00 4 500.00 NAMIBIAN STUDENTS SADC STUDENTS NON SADC STUDENTS Tuition Fees 50% 60% 70% Estimated tuition fees can be obtained from the website indicated above. HOSTEL FEES (N$)(per semester) NAME OF CAMPUS NAMIBIAN STUDENTS SADC STUDENTS NON SADC STUDENTS Main/Neudamm/Ogongo/ Eng. José Eduardo dos Santos/Sam Nujoma 11 630.00 11 630.00 19 250.00 (Breakfast included) Hifikepunye Pohamba/ Khomasdal/Katima Mulilo/ Rundu/Southern 7 550.00 7 550.00 11 070.00 (Breakfast included) Health Sciences North (Breakfast excluded) 8 400.00 8 400.00 16 800.00 Health Sciences Windhoek (Breakfast excluded) 14 400.00 14 400.00 28 800.00 Wear and tear fees of N$ 850 (non-refundable) is payable before or on day of Registration. Hostel fees are payable upfront on the day of registration at the beginning of each semester. PAYMENT PLAN ON REMAINING BALANCE (NON-BURSARY/LOAN HOLDERS): Sign a Debit Order/Settlement Agreement at Registration to pay off the outstanding balance by or on 30 June 2018 (only applicable to Namibian students). BANK DETAILS ARE AS FOLLOWS: Account name: UNAM STUDENT DEPOSIT ACCOUNT Account type: Current account Bank name: First National Bank Namibia Account number: 62246793451 Branch code: 281872 Swift code: FIRNNANX Reference number: Student Number (Compulsory)

INSIDE BUSINESS This news is your business NWR tops OPM Citizen Satisfaction Survey 2017 Page 18 Report unauthorised debit orders immediately - BoN Staff Reporter Windhoek Debit order clients’ whose money get deducted from their bank accounts without their permission, are urged to report such deductions as soon as they are detected. Debit orders are often used as a means of payment for a range of services, such as loan repayments and subscriptions fees. They are an instruction between a consumer and a third-party or service provider, where consumers grant third parties permission to deduct money from their bank account for services rendered. The Bank of Namibia reports that often debit orders related disputes arise when third party institutions withdraw amounts before the date continues to collect debit orders that have been cancelled or is subject to a stop payment instruction. It further occurs when third parties debit accounts with incorrect a debit order that is not consistent with the clients’ instruction. In the event where banks determine that the debit order is not authorised, banks may reverse the transaction and any related fees that are charged. When such activities are noticed, consumers should approach the relevant third party and report the unauthorised deduction. Consumers may further cancel a debit order by providing written to the third party whom they have authorised to make the deductions. Additionally, future debit order payments can also be stopped for a given period whereby consumers request that their bank places a stop payment instruction on their account for the exact amount of the Domestic economy contracted by 1.9 percent in Q3 – NSA debit order. Consumers may mitigate the risk of unauthorised debit orders by providing only original bank stamped documents when applying for the product and services. Subscribing to the commercial a useful mitigating measure, as this will inform clients of all deductions from their bank accounts. All in all, the central bank advised consumers to review bank statements each month by looking at each deduction, no matter how small. “When differences are picked up, clients are urged to report them to their bank within 40 days from when the transaction took place, and where fraud is suspected, report the incident at a police station. Consumers are further urged to always protect their banking details and only provide them when deductions have to be effected. When clients are unable to amicably resolve a particular case with their bank, clients may then consult the Bank of Namibia, as it is mandated to mediate between consumers and their banks. This is tion between aggrieved consumers and their respective bank,” reads a statement issued by the Bank of Namibia. Staff Reporter Windhoek The Namibia Statistics Agency (NSA) yesterday confirmed that the domestic economy indeed contracted by 1.9 percent in the third quarter of 2017, compared to a decline of 0.4 percent registered in the corresponding quarter of 2016. According to Statistician General and CEO of the NSA Alex Shimuafeni, the poor performance was mainly attributed to construction, wholesale and retail trade, sectors that recorded contraction in real value added of 36.9 percent, 4.4 percent, 5.5 percent and 1.3 percent, respectively. In a statement released yesterday, Shimuafeni also pointed out that weaker performance was also observed in sectors, such as the public administration and education sectors, that registered declines in real value added of 4 percent and 0.4 percent, respectively. In addition, agriculture, hotels intermediation sectors, recorded slower growth rates in real value added of 5.3 percent, 0.1 percent and 0.8 percent in the third quarter of 2017, compared to string growth of 14 percent, 6.4 percent and 3.9 percent recorded in the corresponding quarter of 2016. Commenting on the latest statistics, Shimuafeni noted that in contrast to poor performance, sectors such as mining, quarrying and manufacturing, posted stronger growth of 11.3 percent and 0.8 percent in real value added, respectively. The NSA also yesterday released the latest Consumer Price Index for November 2017, which indicates at 5.2 percent, as compared to 7.3 percent recorded in November 2016, registering a decrease of 2.1 percentage points. On a monthly to 0.3 percent from 0.1 percent registered a month earlier. Shimuafeni explained that the increase in general price levels over the year emanated mainly from housing, water, electricity, gas and other fuels (8.6 percent), education (7.8 percent), hotels, cafes and restaurants 96.7 percent), transport (6.1 percent) and health (5.7 percent). tion rates for goods were estimated at 0.4 percent and 3.1 percent, respectively, while those for services stood at zero and eight percent, respectively. The corresponding rates recorded during the same period last year stood at 0.4 and 7.9 percent and zero and 6.6, respectively. The highest contributors to housing, water and electricity, and transport, which contributed 45.8 and 15.7 percent, respectively. The average annual and average to November 2017 were estimated at 6.3 percent and 0.5 percent, while the corresponding rates registered during the same period a year earlier stood at 6.7 percent 0.6 percent, respectively. In terms of third quarter trade statistics, the third quarter of 2017 to N.233 million, compared to N.185 million witnessed during the same quarter of the preceding Namibia’s third quarter Gross Domestic Product (GDP) 2017 contracted by 1.9 percent in real terms compared to a decline of 0.3 percent registered in the corresponding quarter of 2016. Source: NSA year. This resulted in worsening of attributable to a decline in exports. Overall exports declined by 2.5 percent to N$15,494 million compared to N$15,884 million recorded in the same period last year. Similarly, imports plunged by 1.4 percent to N,728 million after recording N,069 million in the same quarter last year. Namibia’s key export markets were South Africa (N,697 million), Botswana (N,643 million), Switzerland (N,912 million), China (N,027 million) and Spain (N2 million). In terms of commodities, diamonds, jewellery and and concentrates, copper cathodes and live animals were the major export products over the period, accounting for 75.1 percent of overall export. Expect more. The Development Bank of Namibia is closing on 22 December, after approving N.7 billion for enterprise and infrastructure Bring us your business plans and infrastructure proposals We’ll be waiting to hear from you. Expect more. www.dbn.com.na

New Era

New Era Newspaper Vol 22 No 167

Kundana

Kundana