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New Era Newspaper Thursday March 29, 2018

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Friday, March 29 2018| NEW ERA WORLD 37 Many environment a threat on – Nampa/AFP North Korea’s Kim met China’s Xi on Beijing foreign trip as leader to meet China’s president, - Nampa/AFP Mastering the Art of Project Management: Helpful Tips for SMEs It is a trap that many SMEs fall into. Once the tender is secured and the contract in the bag, small business owners are often quick out of the starting blocks to set out on the actual project execution. Yet according to project management consultant, Bernard Minnaar, this constitutes a crucial mistake that ends up costing SMEs dearly. Between the inking of the contract and the start of the project lies a fundamental process that can make or break the final outcome. Sound project management, advises Minnaar, is something that no business – small or large – can function without. Tackling the mountain – little by little Minnaar explains that SMEs’ reluctance to give project management the necessary attention may stem from a lack of knowledge as to what exactly the process entails and how to master it. He bases his assessment on seven years spent working as a Windhoek-based project management consultant and acting as an advisor to SMEs on how to approach and master this crucial discipline. According to Minnaar, small business owners are generally aware of the correlation between proper project management and the successful completion of the contract, but may believe it to be an insurmountably intricate task for which they do not have the necessary background or training. “SMEs often see project management as a mountain – one they do want to climb, but are not sure how to tackle. My advice in this regard is the age-old adage that teaches: How do you eat an elephant? Little by little. The same holds true for project management. You take on the seemingly overwhelming task and break it down into small, measurable bits.” By following this approach, Minnaar holds, project management evolves from something separate and overwhelming to a daily routine. “To use an everyday example, it must become like brushing your teeth. If you do it every day, you will soon get to know the ropes. Then it becomes a habit, something that naturally forms part of your project. But you need to make that initial commitment and buckle down into the discipline.” Project Management for SMEs Richard Frankle, Managing Partner of Richard Frankle & Partners advises that project management comprises two essential elements: time management and financial management. “Resource management is largely intertwined with time and financial management,” he adds. “The way to get your time management right will be through your resources. The way to get your material flow right will be through financial management. By managing time and finances will you get to the end of the project successfully and on time.” Minnaar agrees. In its simplest form, he says, project management boils down to planning and allocating your resources within a specific timeframe. “Many people have a mental image of a colourful Gantt chart showing a start and a finish point. But that is just a visual tool or a graphic representation. In the end, it is about breaking down the overall project into smaller, simpler and measurable steps of manageable workload.” The process, he explains, ties resources and dates to outputs. Delivery of these outputs requires three inputs, namely labour, material and plant/equipment, with the required funds serving as a resource to finance the allocation and implementation thereof. Project management is then the path that maps these inputs, resources, deliverables and dates from the project start right through to its completion. Minnaar concedes that the way in which an SME will go about project management differs vastly from the approach of a large corporate. “In a big company, you will have a dedicated staff member or department committed to only one aspect of the process, such as human resources and ensuring that the right people are there at the right time or supply management and ensuring that what is needed arrive on time and in the right quantity. These staff members or departments usually have the relevant training and experience to make them experts in their specific field. An SME typically has none of these resources. “In fact, there is usually one person – the owner – who is responsible for all these things, from executing the actual work to planning for tomorrow, next week and months down the line to ensuring that the finances are in place to keep everything going. This is often where the proverbial wheels come off the cart,” Minnaar warns. An SME, he holds, tends to grow from someone who saw an opportunity and took it. Moreover, in all likelihood, the person who capitalised on the perceived gap used to be an employee, someone who excelled at what he or she did. Now, that former employee carries the added responsibility of planning and management. “As a general rule, we gravitate to the things we know and are good at. All too often, that means that planning falls by the wayside as the new SME focuses on getting things done on site, while placing orders in advance and financial planning for say three months from now take a backseat. Initially, the project might progress well. But the lack of planning will soon catch up and cause tremendous difficulties and even sabotage the entire project.” Mastering the art of project management In order to avoid the pitfalls that come with a lack of project management, Minnaar offers practical advice. The golden rule, he says, is to make everything manageable. “You cannot manage what you cannot measure.” The process entails breaking down the full project into tasks with specific deadlines. For example, with a construction project of nine months, the steps towards the endpoint will entail certain milestones. “The first step would be to identify the key milestones you have to achieve by a definite time, for instance, finishing the foundations or having the roofs up before the rainy season starts.” Frankle agrees. “Start by breaking down the programme for your project in the finest detail possible. When tendering, you receive a contract period in which the project must be completed. You know exactly which timeframes you have to work with. So plan your project accordingly.” The next step, Minnaar continues, is to break each identified milestones down into the resources needed and the resources at hand. These resources typically include plant, people, equipment and finances. “Make sure you have what you need. If your plan shows that you will need cash flow six months down the line, contact a partner like Nampro Fund for bridging finance. If you need plant and you don’t have it, make arrangements to rent in advance.” Minnaar cautions that every project will have its own hidden costs. “Always make provision for the fact that there are things you can’t anticipate and will have to pay for.” That does, however, not negate the need for planning. “The better you plan, the more these hidden costs will come to light. Breaking down everything into small, manageable bits doesn’t guarantee that you will identify all the hidden costs, but the number of things you might miss will be reduced drastically. If you break down a N million job into ten bits of N0,000 and you are wrong at any point by 10%, you lose N,000, as opposed to being out by N0,000 on the big picture. Minnaar also draws SMEs’ attention to the need to be as realistic as possible. “It doesn’t help that you have a plan in place if that plan doesn’t reflect what you can achieve. Know what you are getting yourself into. And always leave more than enough breathing room. Remember that everything usually takes longer than you anticipate. However long you think something is going to take, you can add 50% to 100% to get the actual time and effort you will spend on it.” Asked what the hallmark of successful project management is and Minnaar is quick to answer. “The process is based on a project plan, which is a living, evolving initiative. A project plan isn’t a static document that is drawn up on day one, laminated and pasted on the wall. For project management to be successful, the project plan must grow and adapt with the project, as the work progresses. It must be referred to on a daily basis to ensure that you are on track and then adjusted accordingly. In fact, if I see a modified, updated project plan every week, I take it as a sign that the SME is on top of the game and have the hang of project management.” An early start Frankle has a final word of caution for SMEs. Project management, he points out, is a process that requires dedicated focus long before the contract is in the bag. “You cannot embark on project management once you have been awarded the tender. That is too late. It starts at the tender stage. There has to be a solid foundation.” The synergy between elements and phases resembles the construction of a building. If there are faults in the foundation, the entire building may collapse – regardless of how much attention is paid afterwards to getting the walls, windows or the roof just right. The same holds true for a contract, Frankle says. If there are faults in the tender, like under-pricing or an unrealistic time-frame, the entire project runs the risk of failure – irrespective of how well the project is managed subsequently. “We have found many SMEs who submit tenders well below market-related rates. When such SMEs are awarded the contract, they start the project at a crippling disadvantage and then constantly run behind schedule in terms of cash or progress, which means that they finish the project late – if at all. This ruins an SMEs reputation. Either you get blacklisted or you will not get another job.” If you as an SME owner would like more information or need assistance in the area of project management, please contact Johannes Niikondo at NamPro Fund 061 – 388 635

38 Thursday, March 29 2018| NEW ERA Services Notice Notice Notice Notice Notice Notice General Legal Notice Legal Notice Legal Notice Legal Notice Legal Notice Legal Notice CLASSIFIEDS Rates and Deadlines To avoid disappointment of an advertisement not appearing on the date you wish, please book timeously notices: 12:00, two working days prior to placing alterations: 16:00, two days before date of publication in writing only Notices (VAT Exclusive) Legal Notice N4.82 Liquor License N0.00 Name Change N0.00 Birthdays N0.00 Death Notices N0.00 Tombstone Unveiling N0.00 Thank You Messages N0.00 Terms and Conditions Apply. REPUBLIC OF NAMIBIA MINISTRY OF TRADE & INDUSTRY LIQUOR ACT, 1998 NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO A COMMITTEE IN TERMS OF THE LIQUOR ACT, 1998 (regulations 14, 26 & 33) Notice is given that an application in terms of the Liquor Act, 1998, particulars of which appear below, will be made to the Regional Liquor Licensing Committee, Region: OMUSATI 1. Name and postal address of applicant, AMBROSIUS KAMBUTA - N, PO BOX 145, TSANDI, 2. Name of business or proposed Business to which applicant relates OSHIPAYA SHEBEEN 3. Address/Location of premises to which Application relates: OSHIPETO 4. Nature and details of application: SHEBEEN LIQUOR LICENCE 5. Clerk of the court with whom Application will be lodged: OUTAPI 6. Date on which application will be Lodged: 31 MARCH 2018 7 Date of meeting of Committee at Which application will be heard: 16-30 APRIL 2018 REPUBLIC OF NAMIBIA MINISTRY OF TRADE & INDUSTRY LIQUOR ACT, 1998 NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO A COMMITTEE IN TERMS OF THE LIQUOR ACT, 1998 (regulations 14, 26 & 33) Notice is given that an application in terms of the Liquor Act, 1998, particulars of which appear below, will be made to the Regional Liquor Licensing Committee, Region: OMUSATI 1. Name and postal address of applicant, KUUGONGELWA PETRUS K, PO BOX 5504, OSHAKATI 2. Name of business or proposed Business to which applicant relates K.K. SP SHEBEEN 3. Address/Location of premises to which Application relates: ONUUKUTI - OSHANASHIPUNDI 4. Nature and details of application: SHEBEEN LIQUOR LICENCE 5. Clerk of the court with whom Application will be lodged: OUTAPI 6. Date on which application will be Lodged: 30 MARCH 2018 7 Date of meeting of Committee at Which application will be heard: 09 MAY 2018 REPUBLIC OF NAMIBIA MINISTRY OF TRADE & INDUSTRY LIQUOR ACT, 1998 NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO A COMMITTEE IN TERMS OF THE LIQUOR ACT, 1998 (regulations 14, 26 & 33) Notice is given that an application in terms of the Liquor Act, 1998, particulars of which appear below, will be made to the Regional Liquor Licensing Committee, Region: OSHIKOTO 1. Name and postal address of applicant, ESTHER K. ITHANA PO BOX 1853, TSUMEB, 2. Name of business or proposed Business to which applicant relates SHEBEEN 3. Address/Location of premises to which Application relates: EKANGO ONEUMBA OSHITUTUMA 4. Nature and details of application: SHEBEEN LIQUOR LICENCE 5. Clerk of the court with whom Application will be lodged: ONDANGWA 6. Date on which application will be Lodged: 29 APRIL 2018 7 Date of meeting of Committee at Which application will be heard: 09 MAY 2018 REPUBLIC OF NAMIBIA MINISTRY OF TRADE & INDUSTRY LIQUOR ACT, 1998 NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO A COMMITTEE IN TERMS OF THE LIQUOR ACT, 1998 (regulations 14, 26 & 33) Notice is given that an application in terms of the Liquor Act, 1998, particulars of which appear below, will be made to the Regional Liquor Licensing Committee, Region: OSHIKOTO 1. Name and postal address of applicant, SIMON ANGULA MATHEUS PO BOX 19852 OMUTHIYA 2. Name of business or proposed Business to which applicant relates CIMBEBASIA BAR 3. Address/Location of premises to which Application relates: OSHIFUKWA 4. Nature and details of application: SPECIAL LIQUOR LICENCE 5. Clerk of the court with whom Application will be lodged: TSUMEB 6. Date on which application will be Lodged: 29 MARCH 2018 7 Date of meeting of Committee at Which application will be heard: 09 MAY 2018 REPUBLIC OF NAMIBIA MINISTRY OF TRADE & INDUSTRY LIQUOR ACT, 1998 NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO A COMMITTEE IN TERMS OF THE LIQUOR ACT, 1998 (regulations 14, 26 & 33) Notice is given that an application in terms of the Liquor Act, 1998, particulars of which appear below, will be made to the Regional Liquor Licensing Committee, Region: 1. Name and postal address of applicant, ASTERIA N. D. SHASHIPAPO LOCATION S. AUSSENKEHR 2. Name of business or proposed Business to which applicant relates LET IT HAPPEN SHEBEEN 3. Address/Location of premises to which Application relates: LOCATION S. AUSSENKEHR KARASBURG DISTRICT 4. Nature and details of application: TRANSFER OF SHEBEEN LIQUOR LICENCE FROM ASTERIA N. SHASHIPAPO TO JOSUA NAUYOMA 5. Clerk of the court with whom Application will be lodged: KARASBURG 6. Date on which application will be Lodged: 10 APRIL 2018 REPUBLIC OF NAMIBIA MINISTRY OF TRADE & INDUSTRY LIQUOR ACT, 1998 NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO A COMMITTEE IN TERMS OF THE LIQUOR ACT, 1998 (regulations 14, 26 & 33) Notice is given that an application in terms of the Liquor Act, 1998, particulars of which appear below, will be made to the Regional Liquor Licensing Committee, Region: 1. Name and postal address of applicant, MR. PAULUS KOONGULASHA MUDHENGI PO BOX 303, ONDANGWA, 2. Name of business or proposed Business to which applicant relates BIMBO BAR 3. Address/Location of premises to which Application relates: ONIIMWANDI, ONAYENA OSHIKOTO REGION 4. Nature and details of application: SPECIAL LIQUOR LICENCE 5. Clerk of the court with whom Application will be lodged: ONDANGWA 6. Date on which application will be Lodged: 30 APRIL 2018 7 Date of meeting of Committee at Which application will be heard: 13 JUNE 2018 REPUBLIC OF NAMIBIA MINISTRY OF TRADE & INDUSTRY LIQUOR ACT, 1998 NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO A COMMITTEE IN TERMS OF THE LIQUOR ACT, 1998 (regulations 14, 26 & 33) Notice is given that an application in terms of the Liquor Act, 1998, particulars of which appear below, will be made to the Regional Liquor Licensing Committee, Region: OKAKARARA 1. Name and postal address of applicant, LYDIA HIIHO PO BOX 32, OKAKARARA 2. Name of business or proposed Business to which applicant relates KONDANGUNO BAR 3. Address/Location of premises to which Application relates: ERF 88, JOHN TJIKUUA STREET, OKAKARARA 4. Nature and details of application: SPECIAL LIQUOR LICENCE 5. Clerk of the court with whom Application will be lodged: OKAKARARA 6. Date on which application will be Lodged: 09 MARCH 2018- 28 MARCH 2018 7 Date of meeting of Committee at Which application will be heard: 09 MAY 2018 REPUBLIC OF NAMIBIA MINISTRY OF TRADE & INDUSTRY LIQUOR ACT, 1998 NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO A COMMITTEE IN TERMS OF THE LIQUOR ACT, 1998 (regulations 14, 26 & 33) Notice is given that an application in terms of the Liquor Act, 1998, particulars of which appear below, will be made to the Regional Liquor Licensing Committee, Region: OMUSATI 1. Name and postal address of applicant, TITUS ANGHUWO PO BOX 779 OUTAPI- NAMIBIA 2. Name of business or proposed Business to which applicant relates CLASSIC PUB 3. Address/Location of premises to which Application relates: ERF NO. 1553 ONHIMBU LOCATION - OUTAPI TOWN IN OMUSATI REGION 4. Nature and details of application: A SPECIAL LIQUOR LICENCE TO OPERATE FRON 10H00 AM - 02H00 ON MONDAYS - SATURDAYS AND FROM 14H00 -00H00 MIDNIGHT ON SUNDAYS AND PUBLIC HOLIDAYS RESPECTIVELY 5. Clerk of the court with whom Application will be lodged: OUTAPI 6. Date on which application will be Lodged: 31 MARCH 2018 7 Date of meeting of Committee at Which application will be heard: 16 APRIL 2018 Services Offered AANWO ANIMAL CLINIC AND VET SHOP ( Dr. Arnold Olivier) For veterinary services, animal medicines, vaccines, instruments, pet food/accessories & grooming. Windhoek Penelope Tel: 061 248 447 Cell: 0814436474 137 Bach Str. Dorado Valley. Rehoboth Gertruida Tel: 062 52 5440 Cell: 0814436457 Niklaas Olivier Str. FB: @aanwoclinicandpetshop Twitter: @ AanwoClinic Instagram: @aanwo_ animal_clinic Website: www.aanwo. com G R O O T F O N T E I N T O W N P L A N N I N G A M E N D M E N T SCHEME NO. 9 Notice is hereby given in terms of Section 23 of the Town Planning Ordinance 1954, (Ordinance 18 of 1954), as amended, that the Grootfontein Town Planning Amendment Scheme No. 9, has been submitted to the Minister of Urban and Rural Development for approval. Copies of the Grootfontein Town Planning Amendment Scheme No. 9 and the maps, plans, documents and other relevant matters are lying at the Municipality of Grootfontein and also at the Namibia Planning Advisory Board (NAMPAB), Ministry of Urban and Rural Development, 2nd Floor, Room AMENDMENT SCHEME NO. 8 Notice is hereby given in terms of Section 23 of the Town Planning Ordinance 1954, (Ordinance 18 of 1954), as amended, that the Lüderitz Town Planning Amendment Scheme No. 8, has been submitted to the Minister of Urban and Rural Development for approval. Copies of the Lüderitz Town Planning Amendment Scheme No. 8 and the maps, plans, documents and other relevant matters are lying the Lüderitz Town Council and also at the Namibia Planning Advisory Board (NAMPAB), Ministry of Urban and Rural Development, 2nd TSUMEB TOWN PLANNING AMENDMENT SCHEME NO. 12 Notice is hereby given in terms of Section 23 of the Town Planning Ordinance 1954, (Ordinance 18 of 1954), as amended, that the Tsumeb Town Planning Amendment Scheme No. 12, has been submitted to the Minister of Urban and Rural Development for approval. Copies of the Tsumeb Town Planning Amendment Scheme No. 12 and the maps, plans, documents and other relevant matters are lying the Municipality of Tsumeb and also at the Namibia Planning Advisory Board (NAMPAB), Ministry of Urban and Rural Development, 2nd MARIENTAL TOWN PLANNING AMENDMENT SCHEME NO. 11 Notice is hereby given in terms of Section 23 of the Town Planning Ordinance 1954, (Ordinance 18 of 1954), as amended, that the Mariental Town Planning Amendment Scheme No. 11, has been submitted to the Minister of Urban and Rural Development for approval. Copies of the Mariental Town Planning Amendment Scheme No. 11 and the maps, plans, documents and other relevant matters are lying at the Municipality of Mariental and also at the Namibia Planning Advisory Board (NAMPAB), Ministry of Urban and Rural Development, 2nd Floor, Room ONDANGWA TOWN PLANNING AMENDMENT SCHEME NO. 5 Notice is hereby given in terms of Section 23 of the Town Planning Ordinance 1954, (Ordinance 18 of 1954), as amended, that the Ondangwa Town Planning Amendment Scheme No. 5, has been submitted to the Minister of Urban and Rural Development for approval. Copies of the Ondangwa Town Planning Amendment Scheme No. 5 and the maps, plans, documents and other relevant matters are lying for Town Council of Ondangwa and also at the Namibia Planning Advisory Board (NAMPAB), Ministry of Urban and Rural Development, 2nd OUTAPI TOWN PLANNING AMENDMENT SCHEME NO. 5 Notice is hereby given in terms of Section 23 of the Town Planning Ordinance 1954, (Ordinance 18 of 1954), as amended, that the Outapi Town Planning Amendment Scheme No. 5, has been submitted to the Minister of Urban and Rural Development for approval. Copies of the Outapi Town Planning Amendment Scheme No. 5 and the maps, plans, documents and other relevant matters are lying for Town Council of Outapi and also at the Namibia Planning Advisory Board (NAMPAB), Ministry of Urban and Rural Development, 2nd OMUTHIYA TOWN PLANNING AMENDMENT SCHEME NO. 1 Notice is hereby given in terms of Section 23 of the Town Planning Ordinance 1954, (Ordinance 18 of 1954), as amended, that the Omuthiya Town Planning Amendment Scheme No. 1, has been submitted to the Minister of Urban and Rural Development for approval. Copies of the Omuthiya Town Planning Amendment Scheme No. 1 and the maps, plans, documents and other relevant matters are lying for Town Council of Omuthiya and also at the Namibia Planning Advisory Board (NAMPAB), Ministry of Urban and Rural Development, 2nd REHOBOTH TOWN PLANNING AMENDMENT SCHEME NO. 13 Notice is hereby given in terms of Section 23 of the Town Planning Ordinance 1954, (Ordinance 18 of 1954), as amended, that the Rehoboth Town Planning Amendment Scheme No. 13, has been submitted to the Minister Urban and Rural Development for approval. Copies of the Rehoboth Town Planning Amendment Scheme No. 13 and the maps, plans, documents and other relevant matters are lying for Town Council of Rehoboth and also at the Namibia Planning Advisory Board (NAMPAB), Ministry of Urban and Rural Development, 2nd REHOBOTH TOWN PLANNING AMENDMENT SCHEME NO. 14 Notice is hereby given in terms of Section 23 of the Town Planning Ordinance 1954, (Ordinance 18 of 1954), as amended, that the Rehoboth Town Planning Amendment Scheme No. 14, has been submitted to the Minister Urban and Rural Development for approval. Copies of the Rehoboth Town Planning Amendment Scheme No. 14 and the maps, plans, documents and other relevant matters are lying for Town Council of Rehoboth and also at the Namibia Planning Advisory Board (NAMPAB), Ministry of Urban and Rural Development, 2nd WINDHOEK TOWN PLANNING AMENDMENT SCHEME NO. 97 Notice is hereby given in terms of Section 23 of the Town Planning Ordinance 1954, (Ordinance 18 of 1954), as amended, that the Amendment Scheme No. 97, has been submitted to the Minister Urban and Rural Development for approval. Planning Amendment Scheme No. 97 and the maps, plans, documents and other relevant matters are lying for at the Namibia Planning Advisory Board (NAMPAB), Ministry of Urban and Rural Development, 2nd Any person who wishes to object to the approval of the Town Planning Scheme, should lodge objections in writing to the Secretary, Namibia Planning Advisory Board (NAMPAB), Private Bag 13289, Windhoek on / before 17 May 2018. D. D. BEUKES CHAIRMAN NAMIBIA PLANNING ADVISORY BOARD, WINDHOEK, 2018

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