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New Era Newspaper Wednesday July 19, 2017

  • Text
  • Namibia
  • Windhoek
  • Tender
  • Namibian
  • Procurement
  • Regional
  • Certificates
  • Learners
  • Valid
  • Olufuko

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18 Wednesday, July 19 2017 | NEW ERA TENDER INFORMATION As an added bonus for our readers we will publish the results of all tenders opened in public from Mondays to Thursdays on a regular basis. This information is noted and reported by a New Era Reporter Closing at NamWater 20 June 2017 Four more tenders closed at the Namibia Water Corporation Head Quarters, 176 Iscor Street, Windhoek at 11H00 on Tuesday, 20 June 2017. G/RFQ/NW13/2018 Remote Flow Meters Five offers were received for the supply and delivery of DN 200 PN 10, DN 150 PN16 and DN 350 PN10 Remote Flow Meters to the Namibia Water Corporation. Tender prices (excluding VAT) and mandatory certificates attached as announced for: 1. Ecotech 4 544.32; all certificates attached and valid 2. Evale Holdings 642.11; all certificates attached and valid 3. Dynamic Power Solutions 610.44; all certificates attached and valid 4. Central Technical Supplies 0 096.84; no affirmative action compliance certificate attached; all other certificates attached and valid 5. Valco Pipes no total tender price provided; no affirmative action compliance and company registration certificates attached; all other certificates attached and valid G/RFQ/NW11/2018 Remote Flow Meters Five offers were received for the supply and delivery of one (1) DN 200 PN 10 Remote Flow Meter to the Namibia Water Corporation. Tender prices (excluding VAT) and mandatory certificates attached as announced for: 1. Ecotech 8 309.94; no affirmative action compliance certificate attached; all other certificates attached and valid 2. Evale Holdings 681.83; all certificates attached and valid 3. Dynamic Power Solutions 959.28; all certificates attached and valid 4. Central Technical Supplies 837.20; no affirmative action compliance certificate attached; all other certificates attached and valid 5. Valco Pipes 935.25; no affirmative action compliance certificate attached; all other certificates attached and valid G/RFQ/NW16/2018 Compact Water Flow Meters and Pressure & Level Transmitters Five offers were received for the supply and delivery of 3 X DN 200 PN 10, 1 X DN 100 PN 10 and 1 X DN 80 PN 16 Remote Flow Meters to the Namibia Water Corporation. Tender prices (excluding VAT) and mandatory certificates attached as announced for: 1. Ecotech 2 021.59; no affirmative action compliance certificate attached; all other certificates attached and valid 2. Evale Holdings 6 433.59; all certificates attached and valid 3. Dynamic Power Solutions 0 057.40; all certificates attached and valid 4. Central Technical Supplies 7 960.10; no affirmative action compliance certificate attached; all other certificates attached and valid 5. Valco Pipes no total tender price provided; no affirmative action compliance certificate attached; all other certificates attached and valid SC/RFQ/NW-01/2018 Upgrading of Groundwater Flow Model Three technical proposals were received for the upgrading of the numerical Groundwater Flow Model for the lower Kuiseb Aquifers to the Namibia Water Corporation. This tender has been conducted in accordance with the twinenvelope system whereby only technical proposals were read out at this stage whilst financial proposals will be read out at a later stage. Technical proposals as announced for: 1. GSC Water and Environmental Consultants 2. SLR Environmental Consulting Introduction THE PUBLIC PROCUREMENT ACT The Public Procurement Act, Act no. 15 of 2015 that comes into effect as from 01 April 2017 replaced the Tender Board Act, Act no. 16 of 1996 in it’s whole. According to previous newspaper articles the need to introduce this Act was as a result of the public outcry for the improvement of operations and administration (governance) of the previous Tender Board in order to ensure transparency in the public procurement systems. Purpose of the Act The purpose of the said Act is amongst others to enforce control over the following functions: Procurement of goods, works and services The letting or hiring of goods Obtaining sole rights to for, or on behalf of public entities for the disposal of assets. The establishment/appointment of the Procurement Policy Unit, Central Procurement Board, Procurement Committees, Procurement Management Units and Bid Evaluation Committees and the provision of their powers and functions. Provision of procurement methods, bidding process, bidding challenges and review. Ensure preferences to categories of persons which include Namibian registered Small-and-Medium Enterprises, joint venture businesses, local suppliers, contractors and service providers for goods manufactured, mined, extracted, produced or grown in Namibia. Objects of the Act: As it’s main objective this Act strives to promotes integrity, accountability, transparency, competitive supply, effectiveness, efficiency, fairness in dealings, timeous responses, to inform stakeholders about decisions made, consistency at all times, always operating in a legal manner as well as to ensure proper integration in the procurement of assets, works and services which amongst others will bring about: Harmonized procurement policies, systems and practices Close monitoring of compliance by public entities Building/strengthening procurement capacity in Namibia Another important objective is to promote, facilitate and strengthen efforts to implement the empowerment and industrialization policies of the Government of the Republic of Namibia including: Job creation for Namibians Empowerment of Namibian Small and Medium Enterprises, women and youth To always first opt for local Namibian produced goods and services. Preferential treatment in the award of procurement contracts to: Namibian registered Small-and-Medium Enterprises, and joint venture businesses Local suppliers, contractors and service providers for goods manufactured, mined, extracted, produced or grown in Namibia. Namibian registered entities that promotes the protection of the environment, maintain ecosystems and sustainable use of natural resources Namibian natural persons or categories of persons, including persons who have been economically or educationally disadvantaged by past racial discriminatory laws or practices. Definitions contained in the Act: “procurement” means to obtain/get hold of goods, services, works, non/consultancy services by means of purchase (buying), rental, lease or hire-purchase “Minister” referred to in this Act means the Minister of Finance “public entity” means an office, ministry or agency of the Government, including: A Local Authority A Regional Council A Public Enterprises as referred to in the Public Enterprises Governance Act A body or trust that is owned or controlled by the Government, when engaged in any procurement individually or in a consortium and An entity declared as public entity by the Minister of Finance “accounting officer” means the accounting officer of a public entity “bid” means an offer or proposal submitted in response to a request to supply goods, works or services, or any combination thereof, and, where applicable, includes any pre-qualification process “bidder” (tenderer/ contractor) means a participant in procurement or prequalification process, and includes a contractor “bidding document”- means any document issued by a public entity on the basis of which bidders prepare bids; and includes any document which contains instructions to bidders, specification, maps, designs, terms of reference, work schedules, evaluation criteria, bills of quantities, conditions of contract or other similar items “bid evaluations committee” means an ad hoc (needed only for a specific purpose/interim) bid evaluation committee established for the evaluation of bids required and in terms of section 26 of the Act “bid security” mean security/guarantee that may be required for the original bid submission/performance of a contract “Board” means the juristic body (consisting of nine members), appointed by the Minister of Finance to be known as the Central Procurement Board of Namibia. “consultancy services” means services of an advisory or intellectual nature not necessarily related to the provision of goods and services or execution of works “goods” means objects of every kind and description, including commodities, raw materials, manufactured products and equipment, industrial plant, objects in solid, liquid or gaseous form, electricity as well as services incidental to the supply of the goods such as freight and insurance “procurement management unit” means the division or department in the public entity that is responsible to carry out procurement functions as required “procurement contract” means an agreement between a public entity and supplier resulting from a procurement process “responsive”, in relation to a bid, means responsive to the basic requirements of a bid regarding ability to perform and complete on time “services” means any object of procurement, a contract or framework agreement for consultancy and non-consultancy services “supplier” means a person delivering goods, works, consultancy services or other services “threshold” means a threshold amount prescribed for the procurement of goods, works, and consultancy services or non-consultancy services, including disposal of assets for the mandatory application of prescribed procedures “works” means any work associated with the construction, reconstruction, demolition, repair or renovation , site preparation, excavation, erection, building installation of equipment or materials, decoration and finishing, as well as services incidental to construction such as drilling, maping, satellite photography, seismic investigations and similar services DISCLAIMER: NOTE THAT NEITHER NEW ERA NOR THE TENDER BOARD IS RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY WRONG INFORMATION OR ERRORS.

Wednesday, July 19 2017 | NEW ERA ADVERTORIAL 19 Putting Olufuko in proper context New Era journalist Nuusita Ashipala interviewed Nashilongo Ananias – the Chairperson of the Olufuko Committee looking at various aspects of this popular event NE: In layman’s language, what is Olufuko initiation? NA: “Olufuko is a preparation of girls from childhood to adulthood through Olufuko initiation, whereby girls are toughened and trained on how to take care of themselves.” NE: How have you overcome or explained to critics of Olufuko who persist this ceremony is anti-Christian? And are these perceptions still prevailing? Miss Heritage during Olufuko Festival and also will have the best ever traditional fashion show, while we continue to educate our young generation about our traditional, cultural norms, science and arts.” NE: Yet again, Olufuko is hosting its gala dinner the same time as the Ongwediva Trade Fair, what is the trick? NA: “It should be categorically clear that Olufuko Festival is not in a competition with Ongwediva but to us we see Ongwediva Annual Trade Fair and Olufuko Festival complementing each other in their events. We are sincerely inviting all business people in Omusati Region and outside our Region to join us on the 29 th July 2017 during the gala dinner as well as during the festival as from the 25 th August – 05 th September 2017. On the 1 st September 2017, our patron His Excellency Dr Sam Nujoma, the father of the Namibian Nation will officially open the Olufuko Annual Festival for 2017 with the appearance by Maria Nepembe the face of Olufuko 2017 at the Olufuko Center.” Nashilongo Ananias the CEO of Outapi who also doubles as the Chairperson of the Olufuko Committee NA: “It should be clear that Olufuko is not anti-Christian and will not be anti-Christian because those who get initiated are Christians. I think it is only a misunderstanding especially from the ELCIN church. The accusations against Olufuko are baseless because Olufuko is just a cultural practice of our ancestors.” NE: How far is the council with the planned construction of the Olufuko centre? When is the centre envisaged for completion? NA: “The Master Plan and the architectural drawing for Olufuko are done. Looking at the magnitude of the investment needed, the private partners need to come on board to invest on the construction of the centre together with the town council.” NE: Why should parents be encouraged to bring their girls to Olufuko? What lessons could they learn from Olufuko? NA: “Parents need to encourage their girls to participate in Olufuko because they learn not only how to behave in society as young girls but they also learn about the Ovawambo cultural practices that they can pass onto the next generations, for example the importance of culture and the Olufuko initiation and traditional dances as well as the traditional attire. They also learn to respect their Christian beliefs while at the same time preserving and practicing their culture. It is important to celebrate and preserve our cultural heritage just as it is done in other parts of the world.” NE: Any plans to also incorporate the young boys into Olufuko? NA: The plans to incorporate the boys are there, because even now we always have nurses from the Ministry of Health and Social Services doing the circumcision and also give awareness about it in Olufuko Centre. The plan to construct a clinic is in place as the practice cannot be done in open spaces and that is the male initiation.” NE: “What different elements can visitors expect from this year’s Olufuko? NA: “This year visitors will expect to see the hosting of the

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